tenete ciò che si crede.

Gaby: Traveler. Writer. Reader. Student. Activist. Feminist.

I will be your
7 AM sleepy kisses
8 AM French toast
9 AM rushed goodbyes
10 AM love calls
11 AM daydreams
12 PM lunch notes
1 PM new email
2 PM coffee break texts
3 PM reminiscent thoughts
4 PM longing
5 PM drained love
6 PM post-work hugs
7 PM dinner companion
8 PM wine bottle
9 PM tango
10 PM readying for bed
11 PM bedtime stories
12 PM Midnight Sonata
1 AM confessions
2 AM heavy snores
3 AM morning sex
4 AM driftless sleep
5 AM frenzied fantasies
6 AM rapturous sleep
I will be your
Clock.

—Grace C, Timepiece (via yourlifeisyourmessage)

(Source: praistiel, via liebeschwer)

True gender equality is actually perceived as inequality. A group that is made up of 50% women is perceived as being mostly women. A situation that is perfectly equal between men and women is perceived as being biased in favor of women.

And if you don’t believe me, you’ve never been a married woman who kept her family name. I have had students hold that up as proof of my “sexism.”

My own brother told me that he could never marry a woman who kept her name because “everyone would know who ruled that relationship.” Perfect equality – my husband keeps his name and I keep mine – is held as a statement of superiority on my part.

vxpo:

Women and men should both know how to cook because neither feminism nor sexism are going to do shit for you when you’re hungry.

(via wow-a-url)

Your Princess Is in Another Castle: Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds

waiting-for-the-oncoming-storm:

Whoa folks, the guy who won Jeopardy 11 times using game theory just wrote a fantastic article about the recent mass shooting at UCSB. GO READ IT NOW!

Excerpts: 

We (male) nerds grow up force-fed this script. Lusting after women “out of our league” was what we did. And those unattainable hot girls would always inevitably reject us because they didn’t understand our intellectual interest in science fiction and comic books and would instead date asshole jocks. This was inevitable, and our only hope was to be unyieldingly persistent until we “earned” a chance with these women by “being there” for them until they saw the error of their ways. (The thought of just looking for women who shared our interests was a foreign one, since it took a while for the media to decide female geeks existed. The Big Bang Theory didn’t add Amy and Bernadette to its main cast until Season 4, in 2010.)

This is, to put it mildly, a problematic attitude to grow up with. Fixating on a woman from afar and then refusing to give up when she acts like she’s not interested is, generally, something that ends badly for everyone involved. But it’s a narrative that nerds and nerd media kept repeating.”

"Why don’t you ask the women you know who are in committed relationships how they’d feel about guys concocting elaborate ruses to have sex with them without their knowledge to “earn a chance” with them? Or how it feels to be chased by a real-life Steve Urkel, being harassed, accosted, ambushed in public places, have your boyfriend “challenged” and having all rejection met with a cheerful “I’m wearing you down!”?

I know people who’ve been through that. And because life is not, in fact, a sitcom, it’s not the kind of thing that elicits a bemused eye roll followed by raucous laughter from the studio audience. It’s the kind of thing that induces pain, and fear.”

"But the overall problem is one of a culture where instead of seeing women as, you know, people, protagonists of their own stories just like we are of ours, men are taught that women are things to “earn,” to “win.” That if we try hard enough and persist long enough, we’ll get the girl in the end. Like life is a video game and women, like money and status, are just part of the reward we get for doing well."

(via stfu-moffat)